December 7, 1941; Remembering Those Lost Then And Now

December 7th, 1941, as stated by FDR was and always will be a day that lives in infamy. In fact, we were at peace with Japan and in talks on stabilizing the European conflicts hours before the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor. This unbridled act of aggression gave the United States no alternative but to immediately and unequivocally enter into armed conflict to protect our interests and way of life.

What was not foreseen was, by this single act, hundreds of thousands of patriotic young men would lay down their lives to fight for the freedom they held so dearly in their hearts and on their sleeves. Suffering through horrific engagements on the beaches of Normandy, in Tripoli, Guam and Bataan, the latter of which claimed the lives of over 10,000 prisoners of war through barbarism and war crimes. The war involving our “greatest generation” began with the bombing of Pearl Harbor and ended with the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The loss of life on both sides was astronomical.

War is never pretty. It’s a grisly and ghastly, almost unimaginable horror that brave young men and women selflessly volunteer for when the need arises. All the while not knowing that they may never return from their mission to protect our freedom. To die in another land in order to secure order out of chaos.

WWI, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Kuwait, Afghanistan, Iraq…there will be more, and we must never forget the values that inspire us and call us to action when needed. Further, we must never forget those who have given selflessly of themselves for our rights, freedom and liberty. They served with honor and many we left on the battlefield defending this country’s honor with their blood. Never forget; never take for granted; never underestimate the American soldier.

Thanks to all who serve, PPL Motorhomes.